Telecom brings machines closer

In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell patented the telephone, one of several milestones in the development of communications technology in the second half of the 19th century. Morse’s telegraph and Marconi’s radio were other important strides. Researchers in Europe and the United States increasingly began to see electromagnetic waves as an interesting alternative to wires to connect transmitter and receiver.
   Today, we are reliving history at a higher technological level. In this issue, we look at an industrial world making increasing demands on telecommunication technologies. Fast, reliable data transmission can create new productivity levels in many industrial applications. The next step is wireless technology, which aims to simplify both communication with and synchronization of devices – especially where wire connections are difficult.
   According to Michael Lawton, business journalist and author of the article “A New Wave in Industrial Communication” in this issue of Evolution, the use of radio frequencies for industrial monitoring and control is still in its infancy, although the power of radio is increasing all the time.
   Great developments have been made in data communication technology and remote applications, which provide more than a vital bridge for many isolated working environments. In this issue, we visit BP offshore in Norway, where the company is increasingly relying on telecommunications for oil rig operations. They describe their maintenance work there as “communications intensive.”
   Kiruna, Sweden, lies 150 miles north of the Arctic Circle and is home to LKAB, a high-tech mining operation producing iron ore. Preventive maintenance systems and CoMo Link from SKF have helped avoid costly breakdowns. Information is transmitted from sensors reporting vibrations; faults are analyzed online. In six years of using remote analysis and expertise, there hasn’t been a single breakdown.
   From the Scandinavian Shield we travel to the United States. On a recent visit to the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center at Penn State University, Dr. Gus Rosenberg demonstrated to an SKF team the technological breakthroughs made with an artificial heart for humans. This indeed is a gift of life: The device, called the LionHeart, has been successfully implanted into humans.
   As we leave you with a thought about the gift of life, we also invite you to join us in our next issue, in which we explore applications used in everyday life. Please contact me if you have any questions or feedback about Evolution. If you have any questions on service or product solutions or if you would like to order extra copies of Evolution, please contact your SKF office, distributor or dealer.
   See you soon.

Related Content

In 1876, Alexander Graham Bell patented the telephone, one of several milestones in the development of communications technology in the second half of the 19th century. Morse’s telegraph and Marconi’s radio were other important strides. Researchers in Europe and the United States increasingly began to see electromagnetic waves as an interesting alternative to wires to connect transmitter and receiver.
   Today, we are reliving history at a higher technological level. In this issue, we look at an industrial world making increasing demands on telecommunication technologies. Fast, reliable data transmission can create new productivity levels in many industrial applications. The next step is wireless technology, which aims to simplify both communication with and synchronization of devices – especially where wire connections are difficult.
   According to Michael Lawton, business journalist and author of the article “A New Wave in Industrial Communication” in this issue of Evolution, the use of radio frequencies for industrial monitoring and control is still in its infancy, although the power of radio is increasing all the time.
   Great developments have been made in data communication technology and remote applications, which provide more than a vital bridge for many isolated working environments. In this issue, we visit BP offshore in Norway, where the company is increasingly relying on telecommunications for oil rig operations. They describe their maintenance work there as “communications intensive.”
   Kiruna, Sweden, lies 150 miles north of the Arctic Circle and is home to LKAB, a high-tech mining operation producing iron ore. Preventive maintenance systems and CoMo Link from SKF have helped avoid costly breakdowns. Information is transmitted from sensors reporting vibrations; faults are analyzed online. In six years of using remote analysis and expertise, there hasn’t been a single breakdown.
   From the Scandinavian Shield we travel to the United States. On a recent visit to the Milton S. Hershey Medical Center at Penn State University, Dr. Gus Rosenberg demonstrated to an SKF team the technological breakthroughs made with an artificial heart for humans. This indeed is a gift of life: The device, called the LionHeart, has been successfully implanted into humans.
   As we leave you with a thought about the gift of life, we also invite you to join us in our next issue, in which we explore applications used in everyday life. Please contact me if you have any questions or feedback about Evolution. If you have any questions on service or product solutions or if you would like to order extra copies of Evolution, please contact your SKF office, distributor or dealer.
   See you soon.

Rachael Smythe  
Editor-in-chief

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